Curriculum Vitae

Articles and book chapters―Native American literature:

“A Darwinian Source for Faulkner’s Indians in ‘Red Leaves,’ ” Studies in Short Fiction 10 (1973): 421–23.

“ “In Defense of Fiction about the American Indian,” Indian Programs 2 (1976): 5–8.

“ “George Webb’s Naco: An Unpublished Novel of Pima Ranch Life,” American Indian Quarterly 3 (1977): 132–51.

“The Popularity of Dan Cushman’s Stay Away, Joe among American Indians,” Arizona Quarterly 33 (1977): 216–40.

“Ken Kesey’s Indian Narrator: A Sweeping Stereotype?”, Lex et Scientia, 13 (January-June 1977): 18-21; reprinted in A Casebook on Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, ed. George J. Searles (Albuquerque: Univ. of New Mexico Press, 1992), pp. 5–11; reprinted CD-ROM Exploring Novels, ed. Diane Telgen (Gale Research, 1998).

“Animals and Human Development in the Contemporary American Indian Novel,” Western American Literature 14 (1979): 133–48.

“Animals and Theme in Ceremony,” American Indian Quarterly 5 (1979): 13–18; reprinted in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony: A Casebook, edited by Allan Chavkin (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002), pp. 17–22.

“The Indians in Martin Cruz Smith’s Nightwing,” American Indian Quarterly 5 (1979): 155–59. Reprinted in Qua Töqti (Hopi tribal newspaper) 8 (August 19, 1982): 5.

“Leo Simmons’ Sun Chief: Autobiography, Biography, or Literature?” Arizona Quarterly 37 (1981): 256–64.

“The Indian Half-Breed in Turn-of-the-Century American Short Fiction,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 9 (1985): 1–12.

“The Contemporary Indian Romance: A Review Essay,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 15 (1991): 97–125.

“Three Student Guides to Louise Erdrich’s Love Medicine,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 16 (1992): 167–73.

Foreword to Thomas Fall’s The Ordeal of Running Standing, Norman, University of Oklahoma Press, 1993): iii–vii.

Two entries: “Louise Erdrich” and “Love Medicine” in Guide to American Literature (New York: St. James Press, 1994, revised 2000): 301–02 and 1006 (pp. 273–75 in the 2000 revision, published in Detroit).

“First Death in the Fourth World: Teaching the Emergence Myth of the Hopi Indians.” American Indian Quarterly 19 (1995): 75–89.

“Literary Criticism in Cogewea: Mourning Dove’s Protagonist Reads The Brand,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 19 (1995): 45–65.

“Native American Writing: Fiction,” in The Oxford Companion to Women’s Writing in the United States, ed. Cathy N. Davidson and Linda Wagner-Martin. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. Pp. 616–18.

“Silko’s Originality in ‘Yellow Woman’ ” [with Heather Holland, Ann Cavanaugh Sipos, Jian “Stan” Shi, Nora El-Aasser, Melissa Fiesta Blossom, Carolyn Leslie Grossman, Jennifer A. Thornton, and Vanessa Holford Diana], Studies in American Indian Literatures 8 (1996): 61–75. To be reprinted in a volume of Short Story Criticism by Gale Research Group, vol. 66, due out 2004. [Original essay published in collaboration with several of my graduate students, all now graduated.]

“Louise Erdrich,” in Native American Writers of the United States, volume 175 of the Dictionary of Literary Biography, ed. Kenneth M. Roemer. Detroit: Gale Research (A Bruccoli Clark Layman Book): 1997. Pp. 84–100.

“Reading Group Guide to Louise Erdrich’s The Antelope Wife,” a six-page guide [n.d., published 1998], Harper/Collins.

“Chronology of Events in Love Medicine,” in Louise Erdrich’s Love Medicine: A Casebook, ed. Hertha D. Sweet Wong (Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 225–28 [adapted from one of my chapters in A Reader’s Guide to the Novels of Louise Erdrich (1999)].

“Native American Fiction,” PMLA [“Special Millenium Issue”], vol. 115, no. 7 (December 2000), p. 1989.

“Reading Group Guide to Louise Erdrich’s The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse,” 12-page guide [n.d., [published 2002], Harper/Collins.

“The Facts of Fictional Magic: John Tanner as a Source for Louise Erdrich’s Tracks and The Birchbark House,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal, vol. 24, no. 4 (2000): 37–54.

“ ‘The earth itself was sobbing’: Madness and the Environment in Novels by Leslie Marmon Silko and Louise Erdrich,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 26 (2002): 113–24; reprinted in Gathering Native Scholars: UCLA’s Forty Years of American Indian Culture and Research, ed. Kenneth Lincoln (Los Angeles: UCLA American Indian Studies Center, 2009), pp. 521–33.

“Louise Erdrich’s Lulu Nanapush: A Modern-Day Native American Wife of Bath?” SAIL: Studies in American Indian Literatures 15 (2003): 92–103.

“ ‘In the old language’: A Glossary of the Ojibwe Words, Phrases, and Sentences in Louise Erdrich’s Novels,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 27, No. 3, 53–70.

“Study Guides to Seven Erdrich Novels” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Louise Erdrich, ed. Greg Sarris, Connie A. Jacobs, and James R. Giles (New York: Modern Language Association, 2004), pp. 230–38.

“Gender and Christianity: Strategic Questions for Teaching The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse” in Approaches to Teaching the Works of Louise Erdrich, ed. Greg Sarris, Connie A. Jacobs, and James R. Giles (New York: Modern Language Association, 2004), pp. 140–46.

“Bloody Mud, Rifle Butts, and Barbed Wire: Transforming the Bataan Death March in Silko’s Ceremony,” American Indian Culture and Research Journal 28, no. 1 (2004): 23–33.

“Grandma’s Wicker Basket: Untangling the Narrative Threads in Silko’s Ceremony” [with Robert M. Nelson], American Indian Culture and Research Journal 28, no. 1 (2004): 5–13.

“Scholarship and Stories, Oxford and Oklahoma, Academe and American Indians: The Words and Worlds of Native American Bard and Storytelling Medievalist Carter Revard” [with Susan Brill de Remirez], in A Salt Companion to Carter Revard (Cambridge, UK: Salt Publishing, 2006), pp. 202–19.

“Mauser’s Illness: Medical Humor in Erdrich’s Four Souls,” in Studies in the Literary Achievement of Louise Erdrich, Native American Writer: Fifteen Critical Essays, ed. Brajesh Sawhney (New York: Edwin Mellen Press, 2009), pp. 11–28.

“ ‘That animal sinking in her bones’: The Unforgettable June Kashpaw’ in Studies in the Literary Achievement of Louise Erdrich, Native American Writer: Fifteen Critical Essays, ed. Brajesh Sawhney (New York: Edwin Mellen Press, 2009), pp. 243–47.

“ ‘Imagined places and characters’: Louise Erdrich’s Recasting of The Plague of Doves.” Submitted to PMLA [31 pages in MS].

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