Curriculum Vitae

Articles and book chapters―medieval literature:

“Volume-Year Correspondence Chart for Periodicals,” in A Manual of the Writings in Middle English, 1050-1500, vol. 1, The Romances, ed. J. Burke Severs (New Haven: The Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1967), pp. 185–98 [with Douglas A. Burger].

“Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale and Its Teller,” English Record 18 (1968): 54–60.

“The Pairing of the Franklin’s Tale and the Physician’s Tale,” Chaucer Review 3 (1969): 275–79.

“The Climax in the Merchant’s Tale,” Chaucer Review 6 (1971): 38–43. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 233–39.

January, Knight of Lombardy,” Neuphilologische Mitteilungen 72 (1971): 735–38.

“Chaucer’s Merchant and the Tale of January,” Costerus: Essays in English and American Language and Literature 5 (1972): 1–25.

“Chaucer’s Merchant’s Tale and the Decameron,” Italica­ 50 (1973): 266-83. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 240–60.

“Conrad’s ‘Amy Foster’ and Chaucer’s Prioress,” Nineteenth-Century Fiction 30 (1975): 111–15.

“Art and Scatology in the Miller’s Tale,” Chaucer Review 12 (1977): 90-102. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 1–16.

“Noah and the Old Man in the Pardoner’s Tale,” Chaucer Review 15 (1981): 250–54. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 280–85.

“The Plague and Chaucer’s Pardoner,” Chaucer Review 16 (1982): 257–69. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 286–301.

Three chapters on John Gower: “The Tale of Acteon,” ‘The Tale of Acis and Galetea,” and “Diabolical Treachery in the Tale of Nectanabus,” in John Gower’s Literary Transformations in the Confessio Amantis: Original Texts and Translations, ed. Peter G. Beidler (Washington, D.C.: University Press of America, 1982), pp. 7–10, 11–14, 83–90.

“Chaucer and the Trots: What to Do about Those Modern English Translations,” Chaucer Review 19 (1985): 290–301.

“John Gower,” comprehensive bibliography on Gower for Volume 7 of Albert E. Hartung’s A Manual of the Writings in Middle English, 1986, pp. 2195–2210; 2398–2418 [with John Hurt Fisher, Wayne R. Hamm, and Robert F. Yeager].

Lippijn: A Middle Dutch Source for the Merchant’s Tale?,” Chaucer Review 23 (1989): 236–50 [with Therese Decker]. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 261–79.

“The Miller’s Tale in China,” Chaucer Newsletter 11 (1989): 3, 8 [with Xiao Anpu]. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 17–22.

“Transformations in Gower’s Tale of Florent and Chaucer’s Wife of Bath’s Tale,” in Chaucer and Gower: Difference, Mutuality, Exchange, ed. R. F. Yeager, in English Literary Studies: University of Victoria Monograph Series, No. 51 (1991): 100–14. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 72–90.

“The Reeve’s Tale and Its Flemish Analogue,” Chaucer Review 26 (1992): 282–92.

“Chaucer’s Reeve’s Tale, Boccaccio’s Decameron IX, 6, and Two ‘Soft’ German Analogues,” Chaucer Review 28 (1994): 237–51.

“Chaucer’s Request for Money in the Man of Law’s Prologue,” Chaucer Yearbook 2 (1995): 1–15.

“William Cartwright, Washington Irving, and the ‘Truth’: A Shadow Allusion to Chaucer’s Canon’s Yeoman’s Tale,” Chaucer Review 29 (1995): 434–39.

“Dramatic Intertextuality in the Miller’s Tale: Chaucer’s Use of Characters from Medieval Drama as Foils for John, Alisoun, Nicholas, and Absolon” [with Elizabeth M. Biebel, Tracey Cummings, Anne Dickson, Elaine Glanz, Christine Lynch Berg, and Jennifer McNamara Bailey], Chaucer Yearbook 3 (1996): 1–19.

“The Price of Sex in Chaucer’s Shipman’s Tale,” Chaucer Review 31 (1996): 5–17. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 116–32.

“Teaching Chaucer as Drama: The Garden Scene in the Shipman’s Tale,” in a special symposium on teaching Chaucer edited by Christine Rose in Exemplaria 8 (1996): 485–93. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 133–43.

“Contrasting Masculinities in the Shipman’s Tale: Monk, Merchant, and Wife,” in Masculinities in Chaucer, ed. Peter G. Beidler, Boydell & Brewer, 1998, pp. 131–42. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 144–60.

“Just Say Yes, Chaucer Knew the Decameron: Or, Bringing the Shipman’s Tale Out of Limbo,” in The Decameron and the Canterbury Tales, ed. Leonard Michael Koff and Brenda Deen Schildgen (Teaneck, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2000), pp. 25–46. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 161–90.

“Some Teaching Strategies and Study Questions for Peter G. Beidler’s Bedford Edition of The Wife of Bath,” published to Bedford’s web site in June 2000. Eighteen pages.

“Chaucer’s Wife of Bath’s ‘foot-mantel’ and Her ‘hipes large’,” Chaucer Review 34 (2000): 388–97. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 91–104.

“Low-Tech Chaucer: An Experimental Iambic Pentameter Creative Project,” Exercise Exchange: A Journal for Teachers of English in High Schools and Colleges 46 (Fall 2000): 16–20.

“The Reeve’s Tale” in Sources and Analogues of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, volume 1, ed. Robert Correale and Mary Hamel (Woodbridge, Suffolk: D. S. Brewer, 2002), pp. 23–73.

“Introduction” to the Random House reprint of George Philip Krapp’s translation of Chaucer’s Troilus and Cressida (New York: Modern Library, 2002), pp. xi–xxii.

“Fire in the House: Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Misreading of Lines 1139–45 in Chaucer’s Wife of Bath’s Tale,” Chaucer Review 37 (2002): 86–94.

“ ‘Now, deere lady’: Absolon’s Marian Couplet in the Miller’s Tale,” Chaucer Review 39 (2004): 219–22. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 23–28.

“‘That I was born, alas’: Criseyde’s Weary Dawn Song in Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde,” in New Perspectives on Criseyde, ed. Cindy L. Vitto and Marcia Smith Marzec (Asheville, NC: Pegasus Press, 2005), pp. 255–76.

“The Miller’s Tale” in Sources and Analogues of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, volume 2, ed. Robert Correale and Mary Hamel (Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK: D. S. Brewer, 2005), pp. 249–75.

“Where’s the Point: Punctuating Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales,” in “Seyd in forme and reverence”: Essays on Chaucer and Chaucerians in Memory of Emerson Brown, Jr., ed. T. L. Burton and John F. Plummer (Provo, UT: Chaucer Studio Press, 2005), pp. 193–203. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 55–71.

“From Snickers to Laughter: Believable Comedy in Chaucer’s Miller’s Tale,” in Medieval English Comedy, ed. Sandra M. Hordis and Paul Hardwick (Tournholt, Belgium: Brepols, 2007), pp. 195–208. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 37–54.

“Chaucer’s French Accent: Gardens and Sex-Talk in the Shipman’s Tale,” in Comic Provocations: Exposing the Corpus of Old French Fabliaux, ed. Holly A. Crocker (New York: Palgrave, 2006), pp. 149–61. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 191–207.

“New Terminology for Sources and Analogues: Or, Let’s Forget the Lost French Source for the Miller’s Tale,” SAC (Studies in the Age of Chaucer) 28 (2006): 225–30. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 29–36.

“Medieval Children Witness their Mothers’ Indiscretions: The Maid Child in Chaucer’s Shipman’s Tale,” Chaucer Review 44 (2009): 186–204. Reprinted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies, pp. 208–39.

“It’s Miller Time: Baba Brinkman’s Rap Adaptation of the Miller’s Tale,” LATCH (Literary Artifact in Theory, Culture, or History) 3 (2010): 134–50.

“The Owl Similes in Gower’s Tale of Florent and Chaucer’s Wife of Bath’s Tale,” Chaucer’s Canterbury Comedies (Seattle: Coffeetown Press, 2011), pp. 105–15.

“Gower in Seminar: The Confessio Amantis as Publishing Opportunity for Graduate Students,” Approaches to Teaching the Poetry of John Gower, ed. R. F. Yeager and Brian W. Gastle (New York; Modern Language Association, 2011), pp. 202–08.

“Performing Academic Papers,” in Interpretations and Performance: Essays for Alan Gaylord, ed. Susan Yager and Elise E. Morse-Gagne (Provo,UT: Chaucer Studio Press, 2013), pp.149–68.

“Teaching Chaucer’s Middle English,” in Approaches to Teaching the Canterbury Tales, ed. Peter W. Travis and Frank Grady (New York: Modern Language Association, 2014),.

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